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10 Most Common Jobs That Risk Safety for Higher Pay

America’s job market definitely isn’t the most robust in the world right now, but luckily, it has shown improvement. This means that more and more people have finally been able to find jobs to support themselves and their families. That said, there are actually several great paying careers available that people avoid due to fear of injury. It’s a reality in America that, in some instances, employees do trade off their safety for a better paycheck.

Money vs. Safety

Higher pay certainly is a great motivation for anyone. Trading off potential injury for a job should always be a mitigated risk, meaning that you should look into ways to decrease the risks associated with the job. You should also look into continuing education and training that will ensure your safety. Research what types of benefits you’ll be eligible for if you do become injured, disabled or can’t work for a time before making a final decision whether to take the job or not.

Mining, agriculture and construction are a few of the more dangerous industries, with illnesses and fatalities, according to the US Department of Labor. In some states, such as North Carolina, “a worker who gets hurt doing any job-related task is entitled to benefits…you do not have to show your employer was careless, negligent or did anything wrong to get benefits. Workers’ compensation insurance covers all work injuries regardless of their cause because the goal is to provide protection for workers.”1

Research the policies for your specific state concerning workers’ comp if you are considering a high-risk career.

10 Most Dangerous Jobs:

Miner: Coal mining is one of the most dangerous industries that a person could engage in. Dangers include cave-ins, exposure to toxic gases, explosions, and fires. However, coal miners can earn between $45,000 to $75,000 yearly with little to no experience. Until a better renewable energy source is found, coal miners are still in high demand.

Logger: With a fatality rate of 127.8 for every 100,000 workers, logging jobs are amongst the most dangerous that any American could engage in. Not only are loggers working with saws and heavy machinery, they can’t predict when nature will make a “widow maker,” by dropping branches from a great distance.

Electrician: There is a constant need for electricians, both for new construction and for maintenance of existing structures. Typical yearly fatalities run to 62 a year and an average of 15 missed workdays to injury. Electricians with a college education can earn up to $93,000 per year. The median salary is closer to $50,000.

Police Officer: Police Officers miss at least 15 days every single year due to work-related injuries. Salaries are over $55,000 but the average police officers must deal with the dregs of society and criminals daily.

Construction Worker: It’s common for the construction industry to have fatalities. In 2007, there were 160. With heavy machinery, tools, scaffolding, and building materials present, a construction site is one of the most dangerous places to be in and a hard hat’s protection can only go so far.

Commercial Fisherman: From crabbers to longliners, those involved in commercial fishing face serious dangers because they are dependent on things which they have no control over, like weather or ocean predators.

Commercial Diver: The median pay for commercial divers is nearly $50,000,

but the highest industry pay comes in at nearly $94,000. Some commercial divers actually report making well over $100,000. The high rate of injury at 429.6 per 10,000 divers is often overlooked because of the salaries offered.

Private Detective: The median annual salary for a private detective is over $45,000, and top earners can get nearly $80,000. While only one death occurs in this industry per year, the median amount of work days missed due to injury is an astounding 43. The bulk of these injuries are a result of physical altercations and auto accidents.

Athlete: Professional athletes can garner an unimaginable high salary. But their bodies are subjected to abuse and overuse daily. Careers have been extinguished by injuries sustained on the field and court.

Pilot: Top pilots can earn nearly $200,000 a year. With only four pilot deaths a year, some say being a pilot is one of the safest jobs. But as plane fleets are aging and terrorism on the rise, air disasters have increased recently.

Priceless Contributions

There’s no denying that the aforementioned jobs all present their own serious dangers to those employed within them. Luckily for the rest of the world, some people are more suited for high-risk jobs than desk jobs. Because of them, standards of living are not interrupted.

Appreciation must be shown to these brave individuals for their readiness to face danger daily. We must also remember and pay tribute to all the men and women in the military who ensure America’s safety.

Nadine Swayne contributes this article to those brave souls who work dangerous jobs to support their families. Although the pay may be enticing, the risk sometimes outweighs the employment journey. Remember, take into account all the pros and cons, including your family, if you are injured and the life changing elements you may face.

Photo Credits: Flickr Creative Commons   Flickr Creative Commonshttp://www.flickr.com/photos/lindseygee/5894085313/

Footnote1

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10 Most Common Jobs That Risk Safety for Higher Pay
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