Buying a new (old) car for a new driver is harder than you would think?

How To Have The “Talk” .. With Your New Teen Driver

Driving is a privilege that your teen should never enter into lightly. However, with the right amount of education, communication and discipline for rules that get broken, you can ensure that your teen is responsible and knowledgeable enough to get behind the wheel of a car.

Drivers Education Courses

Driver’s education courses are designed to teach your teen driver how to navigate the open roadway, no matter what Mother Nature seems to throw their way. It’s also beneficial in educating them on the rules, laws and guidelines. In addition to driver’s education, spending additional time with your child practicing can help them to become a confident and successful driver. It can also garner them significant discounts when it comes to registering them on your car insurance.

Drinking and Driving Don’t Mix

It’s important to keep the lines of communication open when it comes to your teen. This includes relaying the importance of never drinking and driving. In addition to the property damage, your child could get injured or take the lives of innocent victims by driving under the influence. The repercussions of a DUI can be far reaching and include fines, lawsuits, jail time, the loss of college and future employment opportunities. It may also prove beneficial to have them sit in on a Mother’s Against Drunk Drivers (MADD) meeting to get the full effect of the harm that drinking and driving can do to a person.

Roadside Safety Apps

A well-maintained vehicle can help ensure that your teen driver is safe on the road. You can also secure their safety by enrolling them as members of AAA and having them download apps. This allows them immediate emergency roadside assistance if their vehicle gets a flat tire, runs out of gas or experiences some kind of mechanical failure. Your insurance provider may also have a special app that allows them immediate contact in case of an emergency. This can provide you both with peace of mind knowing that they aren’t stranded on a desolate road.

ICE Parents

Whether you’re involved in an accident or an unexpected emergency arises, you need to ensure that your child is prepared to handle any emergency. A charged cellphone can help your teen seek emergency assistance. It also helps to have in case of emergency (ICE) contacts at the ready in the contact area of phone in case a state trooper or hospital needs to make contact with an adult. This can include parental cellphone and home numbers, insurance company, friends and family members.

Distracted Driving

One of the leading causes of death among teens is distracted driving. Laws are in place to help limit the number of teens that are able to ride in a car together. However, technological devices such as cellphones and notepads can also hinder a teen driver’s ability to focus. That’s why it’s important to teach your teen to tuck their phone away until they arrive at their destination.

Teaching your child to become a responsible driver falls on the shoulders of the parents. From drivers education courses and practice to refraining from drinking and driving and knowing what to do in case of an emergency, it’s important to impart some serious wisdom before you pass the keys over to your child.

Knowing how scary the thought of a teen driving for the first time is for parents, Nadine Swayne offers these “peace of mind’ points of information. Preparing your teen for driving can be a daunting and worrisome but, on the long road, a necessary step in keeping them safe.

Photo credit: https://flic.kr/p/nZ9Lhs

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How To Have The “Talk” .. With Your New Teen Driver
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